Misplaced Modernist

a generation late & a couple grand short

pacegallery:

Reblogged from art21: In a new episode from the Exclusive series, artist Kiki Smith discusses the challenges and pleasures of printmaking. This episode features previously unreleased footage filmed in 2002 at the printmaking workshop, Harlan & Weaver, in New York City. Watch the full episode here: Kiki Smith: Printmaking.

Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Kiki Smith: Printmaking. Copyright Art21, Inc. 2013.

Check out Kiki Smith: Wonder, on view at Pace Gallery’s 510 West 25th Street location through March 29, 2014.

Marina Abramovic and Ulay shared a great love story in the 70s. Together they performed art out of the van they lived in, forming a collective called “the other”.

When their relationship had come to an end, they went to the Great Wall of China to walk it together. Both started walking from the opposite end until they met in the middle for one last big hug before disappearing from each other’s lives.

For her 2010 MoMa retrospective, Marina performed ‘The Artist is Present’, the biggest exhibition of performance art in MoMA’s history.

During the performance, Marina shared a minute of silence staring into the eyes of a complete stranger who was seated in front of her. This is when Ulay arrived, without her prior knowledge. Watch the video below to see what happens.

Source: http://enpundit.com/former-love-surprises-artist-at-her-moma-retrospective-after-decades-apart/

likeafieldmouse:

Noritaka Minami - 1972 (2011)

Project description:

"In the city of Tokyo, a building stands as an anachronism in relation to the surrounding urban landscape. The building in question is the Nakagin Capsule Tower designed by Kisho Kurokawa (1934 – 2007), who was one of the leading members of an influential architectural movement in the 1960s called Metabolism.

Kurokawa designed the building with plug-in capsules to promote exchangeability and modifications to the structure over time, theoretically improving its capacity to adjust to the rapidly changing conditions of the post-industrial society. When the building first opened in March of 1972, it was advertised in the media to signal ‘the dawn of the capsule age.’

The irony presented by the story of the Nakagin Capsule Tower is the fact that it became the last architecture of its kind to be completed in the world. Furthermore, the building has never undergone the process of regeneration during the forty years of existence. Not a single capsule has been replaced since 1972, even though Kurokawa intended them to sustain a lifespan of only twenty-five years.

The design in reality proved to be too rigid in adapting to the unforeseen political and economic developments in the years that followed its construction. With the building’s system in stasis without fulfilling its original mission of continual growth and renewal, it stands like a monument to a future that never arrived in the 21st Century.

Due to the pressures of the city’s real estate market, plans have been discussed for the Nakagin Capsule Tower to be demolished to make way for a conventional apartment complex. Yet, the building today has coincidentally assumed a new role in the city, becoming a poignant reminder of a path ultimately not taken.

Oh do we love Chris Bucklow, and do we love Danziger even more! If you’re not familiar with the wonderful gallery and its singular program, get thee down to 23rd street STAT. 

nprfreshair:

A photogram by Chris Bucklow that’s part of a solo show at New York’s Danziger Gallery.
Artlog:

Each print is a unique display: the sun’s rays pouring through thousands of pinhole apertures in an aluminum foil sheet mapping a human silhouette, each photogram reflecting the length of exposure and intensity of the sun at a given moment. The final result is singular and ethereal, a Cibachrome print that is its own negative.

Oh do we love Chris Bucklow, and do we love Danziger even more! If you’re not familiar with the wonderful gallery and its singular program, get thee down to 23rd street STAT. 

nprfreshair:

A photogram by Chris Bucklow that’s part of a solo show at New York’s Danziger Gallery.

Artlog:

Each print is a unique display: the sun’s rays pouring through thousands of pinhole apertures in an aluminum foil sheet mapping a human silhouette, each photogram reflecting the length of exposure and intensity of the sun at a given moment. The final result is singular and ethereal, a Cibachrome print that is its own negative.